Courses for the Leaders in Sustainability Program

Four courses are required to obtain the LiS certificate (16 total quarter units). Courses must be letter graded. Courses must be graduate level (200 and above). Included in these four is the LiS core course (required for all students, 4 units) and three additional courses to be chosen by the student.  All three additional courses must be sustainability related. At least one of these three sustainability courses must be outside the student's home department.

A list of examples of courses previously approved is provided below. This is not a complete list of all possible courses. As departments change their course listings, timings, professors, and even content quarterly, we cannot keep this list perfectly up to date, so please do due diligence by visiting the department pages and reviewing the course's status. Also, if you find a course that addresses the sustainability and is relevant to the curriculum, you can submit the course description and syllabus for approval.

"Can I take more than 4 courses?" Yes! Students must take the minimum 16 quarter units requirement, but this can be satisfied in a number of ways (eg, multiple two-unit courses, mulitple four unit courses, a six-unit and a two-unit course, etc) and students are more than welcome to go above and beyond the requirement.

Each student must submit a petition to graduate with their course plan in the Fall before their graduation, click here to access the petition to graduate form.

View Winter 2013 Core Course Syllabus

To suggest additional courses, please email charles.corbett@anderson.ucla.edu

This is a suggested course list, and is not comprehensive.  Course times and instructors are subject to change.

ANTHROPOLOGY

297: Seminar: The Cultural Politics of Nature (Special Topics in Anthropology) (4)

This seminar explores how cultural processes govern nature and, conversely, how nature governs human groups’ relations to one another. Focusing on emergent ethnography and anthropological theory, but with an interdisciplinary eye, we will explore topics that include race and nature, agricultural politics and practice, settler colonialism and the politics of indigeneity, natural history, development and conservation politics, forestry, and ecological knowledge production. Letter grading.

ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN

CM247A. Introduction to Sustainable Architecture and Community Planning (4)

(Same as Urban Planning M291.) Lecture, three hours. Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land. Concurrently scheduled with course CM153. Letter grading.

442. Building Climatology (4)

Lecture, four hours. Preparation: basic physics. Design of buildings that specifically respond to local climate; utilization of natural energies, human thermal comfort; sun motion and sun control devices; use of plant materials and landform to modify microclimate. S/U or letter grading.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERGING

C219. Pollution Prevention for Chemical Processes (4)

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 108A. Systematic methods for design of environment-friendly processes. Development of methods at molecular, unit-operation, and network levels. Synthesis of mass exchange, heat exchange, and reactor networks. Concurrently scheduled with course C119. Letter grading.

223. Design for Environment (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Limited to graduate chemical engineering, materials science and engineering, or Master of Engineering program students. Design of products for meeting environmental objectives; lifecycle inventories; lifecycle impact assessment; design for energy efficiency; design for waste minimization, computer-aided design tools, materials selection methods. Letter grading. 

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

226. Geoenvironmental Engineering (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 120. Field of geoenvironmental engineering involves application of geotechnical principles to environmental problems. Topics include environmental regulations, waste characterization, geosynthetics, solid waste landfills, subsurface barrier walls, and disposal of high water content materials. Letter grading.

250A. Surface Water Hydrology (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 150. In-depth study of surface water hydrology, including discussion and interrelationship of major topics such as rainfall and evaporation, soils and infiltration properties, runoff and snowmelt processes. Introduction to rainfall-runoff modeling, floods, and policy issues involved in water resource engineering and management. Letter grading.

250B. Groundwater Hydrology (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 150. Theory of movement and occurrence of water in subterranean aquifers. Steady flow in confined and unconfined aquifers. Mechanics of wells; steady and unsteady radial flows in confined and unconfined aquifers. Theory of leaky aquifers. Parameter estimation. Seawater intrusion. Numerical methods. Applications. Letter grading.

250C. Hydrometeorology (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 250A. In-depth study of hydrometeorological processes. Role of hydrology in climate system, precipitation and evaporation processes, atmospheric radiation, exchange of mass, heat, and momentum between soil and vegetation surface and overlying atmosphere, flux and transport in turbulent boundary layer, basic remote sensing principles. Letter grading.

250D. Water Resources Systems Engineering (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 151. Application of mathematical programming techniques to water resources systems. Topics include reservoir management and operation; optimal timing, sequencing and sizing of water resources projects; and multiobjective planning and conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater. Emphasis on management of water quantity. Letter grading.

259B. Selected Topics in Water Resources (2 to 4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Review of recent research and developments in water resources. Water supply and hydrology, global climate change, economic planning, optimization of water resources development. May be taken for maximum of 4 units. Letter grading.

M262A. Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry (4)

(Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M203A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite for undergraduates: Chemistry 20B. Principles of chemical kinetics, thermochemistry, spectroscopy, and photochemistry; chemical composition and history of Earth's atmosphere; biogeochemical cycles of key atmospheric constituents; basic photochemistry of troposphere and stratosphere, upper atmosphere chemical processes; air pollution; chemistry and climate. S/U or letter grading.

266. Environmental Biotechnology (4)

Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 153, 254A. Environmental biotechnology -- concept and potential, biotechnology of pollutional control, bioremediation, biomass conversion: composting, biogas and bioethanol production. Letter grading.

ENVIRONMENT 

297B. Advanced Topics: Sustainability Project Leaders (2)

Practical study builds on fundamental principles of sustainability.  Students develop practical plan for sustainability-centered project that serves as framework for applied venture with significant implications for sustainability in local, national, and international communities.  It also serves as vehicle for personal and professional leadership development.  S/U or letter grading.

260. Information, Technology, Business, and Society (4)

Seminar, three hours, interdisciplinary research seminar to bring sound social sciences methods to latest technology developments to design effective information-based solutions to social problems.  Topics include selection and framing of research questions, developing measurements, designing appropriate methods (e.g., surveys, experiments, using available data), ethical issues, and writing up research proposals.  S/U or letter grading

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

208. Built Environment and Health (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Limited to public health and urban planning graduate students. Interdisciplinary course on built environment and health and breaking down silos. U.S. and other developed, as well as developing, countries are facing increasingly lethal and costly epidemics of acute and chronic diseases related to land use and built environment decisions. While hazards presented by air and water pollution are well recognized for acute, infectious, and toxicological illnesses, there is increasing recognition of hazards presented by building and community designs that fail to recognize human health. Land use and built environment decisions impact every age group and social and racial minority. Impacts range from very acute (motor vehicle trauma) to long term (obesity, cancer, heart disease). Decisions have as their bases economic, financial, insurance, housing, and other factors. Analysis of each factor and related disease endpoints. S/U or letter grading.

C225. Atmospheric Transport and Transformations of Airborne Chemicals (4)

Lecture, four hours. Preparation: one year of calculus, one course each in physics, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry. Designed for science, engineering, and public health students. Role of regional or long-range transport, and atmospheric lifetimes and fates of airborne chemicals in phenomena such as photochemical smog, acid deposition, stratospheric ozone depletion, accumulation of greenhouse gases, and regional and global distribution of volatile toxic compounds. Concurrently scheduled with course C125. S/U or letter grading.

C235. Environmental Policy for Science and Engineering (4)

Lecture, four hours. Limited to senior undergraduate and graduate students. Examination of theoretical underpinnings of several major types of regulatory policy, as well as practical issues involved in implementing and enforcing each. Exploration of selection and impact of regulatory forms from variety of disciplines and viewpoints. Focus on traditional command and control regulation (including self-executing performance standards and permitting), market-based regulation (such as emissions trading), remediation, and emerging regulatory approaches such as management-based regulation and alternatives assessment. Issues of compliance and enforcement. Concurrently scheduled with course C135. Letter grading.

C240. Fundamentals of Toxicology (4)

Lecture, four hours. Preparation: one course each in biology, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Essential aspects of toxicology, with emphasis on human species. Absorption, distribution, excretion, biotransformation, as well as basic toxicologic processes and organ systems. Concurrently scheduled with course C140. Letter grading.

M242. Toxicodynamics (2)

(Same as Molecular Toxicology M242.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour. Preparation: undergraduate biology and chemistry courses. Requisite: course C240. Examination of recent literature on mechanisms of toxicity or toxicodynamics. Student presentation of papers selected by instructor on various aspects of toxic mechanisms, including free radical mechanisms, mechanisms of cell death, metal toxicity/ion homeostasis, intracellular pH and calcium regulation, stress and adaptive pathways, DNA repair/mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and teratogenesis. Discussion of various papers. S/U or letter grading.

C252D. Properties and Measurement of Airborne Particles (4)

Lecture, four hours. Preparation: one year each of chemistry, physics, and calculus. Basic theory and application of aerosol science to environmental health, including properties, behavior, sampling, and measurement of aerosols and quantitative problems. Concurrently scheduled with course C152D. S/U or letter grading.

C257. Risk Assessment and Standard Setting (4)

Seminar, four hours. Requisites: courses C240, 251, Epidemiology 100. Designed to provide students with opportunity to review scientific basis for association of selected occupational and environmental exposures with disease. Special emphasis on critical evaluations of literature. Attention specifically to interface of science and regulatory standards. Concurrently scheduled with course C157. S/U or letter grading.

258. Identification and Analysis of Hazardous Wastes (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour; one field trip. Requisites: course 252E, Biostatistics 100A. Designed to define, identify, label, and quantify hazardous wastes and how workers should be protected. Provides critical understanding of all analytical aspects of hazardous wastes, health aspects, and regulation and practice of handling hazardous wastes. Letter grading.

C264. Fate and Transport of Organic Chemicals in Aquatic Environment (4)

Lecture, four hours. Preparation: bachelor's degree in science, engineering, geophysics, chemistry, biology, or public health. Evaluation of how and where and in what form and concentration organic pollutants are distributed in aquatic environments. Study of mass transport mechanisms moving organic chemicals between phases, biological degradation and accumulation, and chemical reactions. Effect of humic substances on these processes. Concurrently scheduled with course C164. S/U or letter grading.

212. Applied Ecology (4)

Lecture, four hours. Preparation: one ecology course. Application of ecological theory and principles to solve environmental problems, including conservation biology, assessment of environmental impacts, and restoration ecology and mitigation of environmental impacts. Letter grading.

GEOGRAPHY

204A. Advanced Climatology (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: first year of calculus and acquaintance with Fortran IV. Requisite: course 104. Courses must be taken in sequence. Introduction to tools and concepts of environmental physics of relevance to natural and man-made landscapes. Such basic intellectual, mathematical, and computer programming tools are of special concern to physical geographers, ecologists, and architects. S/U or letter grading.

204B. Advanced Climatology (4)

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: first year of calculus and acquaintance with Fortran IV. Requisite: course 104. Courses must be taken in sequence. Introduction to tools and concepts of environmental physics of relevance to natural and man-made landscapes. Such basic intellectual, mathematical, and computer programming tools are of special concern to physical geographers, ecologists, and architects. S/U or letter grading.

227. Land Degradation (4)

Seminar, three hours. Discussion on impact of human activities and institutions on terrestrial ecosystems and goods and services they provide. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

228. Human Security and Environmental Change (4)

Seminar, three hours. Discussion of impact of environmental change on food, water, and physical security of human populations and societies' adaptations to environmental change. Topics vary from year to year. S/U or letter grading.

M229B. Ecological Issues in Planning (4)

(Same as Urban Planning M234B.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: Urban Planning M265. Science and politics of modern environmentalism and planning in light of transformations inherent in global change, including how to address these questions in ways that go beyond green consumerism and bifurcation of wild, ecological, and human environments. American environmentalism has become dominant model for many conservation practices. Informed by Muirist model of idea of untrammeled nature with people-less set-asides for spiritual and scientific contemplation of nature; this approach used in environmental policy and as key idea in conservation and fragment biology. At opposite end is environmental planning devoted to infrastructure in hyper-human habitats (cities). Exploration of these competing models and many reasons to be skeptical of both in 21st century. Letter grading.

M229C. Resource-Based Development (4)

(Formerly numbered M229.) (Same as Urban Planning M234C.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: course M229A. Some major issues associated with development of specific natural resources. Topics include nature of particular resource (or region associated with it), its previous management, involvement of state, corporations, and local groups, and environmental and social impact of its development. Letter grading.

262. Advanced Field Analysis: Biogeography (8)

Fieldwork, 10 hours. Observation, measurement, and analysis of biogeographic phenomena, including identification and evaluation of biotic populations and communities and their modifications resulting from impact of human activity. S/U or letter grading.

M265. Environmentalisms (4)

(Same as Urban Planning M265.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Review of environmental theories and their practices in dynamic U.S. and international contexts. Issues of climate change, scenario planning, and matrix ecology and its implications in both urban and rural settings. Exploration of problematics of increasing internationalization (or international implications) of environmental practices as part of both green and black economies. What does integrated environmental planning look like in this century? Letter grading.

268. Advanced Projects in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)/Remote Sensing (4)

Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 169 or 170 or Earth and Space Sciences 150. Familiarity with GIS or image processing package expected. Individualized research projects conducted on UNIX platforms within structured course environment. All aspects of modest but original project, including data acquisition, ingestion, and analysis; interpretation of results and presentation in publication-style format. Letter grading.

M270A. Seminar: Climate Dynamics (2 to 4)

(Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M272A and Earth and Space Sciences M270A.) Seminar, two hours. Archaeological, geochemical, micropaleontological, and stratigraphic evidence for climate change throughout geological past. Rheology and dynamics of climatic subsystems: atmosphere and oceans, ice sheets and marine ice, lithosphere and mantle. Climate of other planets. Modeling, simulation, and prediction of modern climate on monthly, seasonal, and interannual time scale. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

M270B. Seminar: Climate Dynamics (2 to 4)

(Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M272B and Earth and Space Sciences M270B.) Seminar, two hours. Archaeological, geochemical, micropaleontological, and stratigraphic evidence for climate change throughout geological past. Rheology and dynamics of climatic subsystems: atmosphere and oceans, ice sheets and marine ice, lithosphere and mantle. Climate of other planets. Modeling, simulation, and prediction of modern climate on monthly, seasonal, and interannual time scale. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

M270C. Seminar: Climate Dynamics (2 to 4)

(Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M272C and Earth and Space Sciences M270C.) Seminar, two hours. Archaeological, geochemical, micropaleontological, and stratigraphic evidence for climate change throughout geological past. Rheology and dynamics of climatic subsystems: atmosphere and oceans, ice sheets and marine ice, lithosphere and mantle. Climate of other planets. Modeling, simulation, and prediction of modern climate on monthly, seasonal, and interannual time scale. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

297C. Evolution, Ecology, Environmentalism, and Roots of Modern American Geography (4)

Seminar, three hours; reading period, one hour. Discussion of how contemporaneous development of modern concepts of evolution, ecology, and environmentalism influenced, and were influenced by, development of modern geography as academic discipline. S/U or letter grading.

LAW

M286. Land Use (1)

(Same as Urban Planning M202A-202B.) Lecture, three hours. Exploration of 21st-century land-use public controls, private practice, and litigation in California from basic planning, zoning, subdivision controls, and official mapping to regional growth management, sustainability, and environmentally sensitive land protection. Letter grading.

M287. Urban Housing (1)

(Same as Urban Planning M276A-276B.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of past 40 years of federal and state programs to stem urban decline and improve housing in U.S.; comparison and contrast of legal and policy initiatives in areas of public housing, housing segregation, mortgage subsidies, landlord/tenant law, urban renewal, and community organizing. Research paper required. Letter grading.

M290. Environmental Law (1)

(Same as Urban Planning M264A-264B.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of field of environmental law through analysis of various legal issues and public policy: legal consequences of public decision-making strategies and allocation of primary responsibility for various environmental decisions. Focus on air pollution and Clean Air Act as means of illustrating policy issues underlying field. Letter grading.

Law 292 - Water Law

Water law presents a unique mix of federal and state regulatory regimes over a resource that is scarce yet ubiquitous and, of course, essential to life.  In this course, we will consider different rights regimes for water, including prior appropriation, riparian rights and groundwater rights.  We will also look at how the public trust doctrine and environmental protection can affect those water rights.  We will compare the view of water as a commodity with the view of water as a human right.  Although we will consider water law at a national level, examples from California will also be used throughout the course.  Our objective will be to not just learn how water is regulated, but to also develop an understanding of the benefits and flaws of the various rights regimes in order to predict how water should be regulated as it becomes an increasingly scarce resource. 

Law 293 - Public Natural Resources Law and Policy

This course examines the laws that address the legal status and management of public lands and natural resources, as well as the history, theory and legal authority that have shaped our country’s approach to public lands management.

The course will explore the theoretical and historical underpinnings of laws and policies that affect exploitation and conservation of resources on public lands. We will analyze the conflicting values and interests that underlie policy debates over the management of natural resources, as well as the legal doctrine that attempts to reconcile those competing values and interests. Anticipated topics include laws and policies affecting minerals, freshwater resources, marine resources, wilderness, rangeland, wildlife, and forests. We will also examine and critically assess the roles of various federal agencies in managing public lands, the interplay among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches in governing federal lands, and the roles of the federal and state governments in public land management.

Law M360 - Environmental Policy for Science, Engineering and Law

This course examines the theoretical underpinnings of several major types of regulatory policy, as well as the practical issues involved in implementing and enforcing each.  We will explore the selection and impact of regulatory forms from a variety of disciplines and viewpoints.  In particular, we will focus on traditional command and control regulation (including self-executing performance standards and permitting), market-based regulation (such as emissions trading), remediation, and emerging regulatory approaches such as management-based regulation and alternatives assessment.  We will also explore issues of compliance and enforcement.

With regard to the theory underpinning the selected policies, students will engage in readings and directed discussions.  They will write brief reaction papers periodically during the quarter, and take turns leading the discussions.  The instructors will, as appropriate, provide overviews and background lectures to introduce the topics.  The course is also focused on how the policies operate “on the ground,” and thus also adopts a problem-based approach.  In a series of simulated scenarios, students will experience the application of these varied policies in a several settings.  The scenarios will include:  (1) analysis of issues arising under federal air quality regulations; (2) calculation of civil penalties; (3) preparation of comments on air quality permits on behalf of the company or interested environmental groups; (4) analysis of a Superfund cleanup; and preparation of an alternatives assessment. 

Law 361 - Environmental Policy and Politics

This course examines the theoretical underpinnings and politics of several major types of regulatory policy, as well as the practical issues involved in implementing and enforcing each.  We will explore the selection and impact of regulatory forms from a variety of  disciplines and viewpoints.  In particular, we will focus on traditional command and control regulation (including self-executing performance standards and permitting), market-based regulation (such as emissions trading), remediation, and emerging regulatory approaches such as prevention-based regulation and management-based regulation. 

With regard to the theory underpinning the selected policies and the politics that drive them, students will engage in readings and directed discussions.  The course is also focused on how the policies operate “on the ground,” and thus also adopts a problem-based
approach.  In a series of four “labs” students will engage in simulated scenarios providing working experience of these varied policies in a variety of settings. The scenarios will include:  (1) air emissions trading; (2) hazardous waste site remediation; (3) information
disclosure; and (4) approval of a new chemical for commercial use. 

Law 438 - International Environmental Law and Policy

This course examines how society manages-–or fails to manage-–environmental issues that fall beyond the authority or capability of one national government.  Class sessions will be divided roughly equally between discussion of cases – specific international environmental issues-–and discussion of general and conceptual topics that cut across specific cases.   Cases will include extended consideration of current issues in the international management of global climate change, plus briefer discussions of some or all of stratospheric ozone depletion, long-range air pollution, protection of biological diversity, and management of global fisheries.  Conceptual sessions will include discussions of the historical development and causal structure of global environmental problems; of the conceptual foundations of international politics and international law; and of the common functions required for governance of any international environmental issue, e.g., interpretation and assessment of scientific knowledge, negotiation, establishment and management of international organizations, implementation of international commitments, and monitoring, reporting, and verification of compliance.  Time permitting, the course may include some discussion of linkages of environment to other international issues, e.g., trade, economic policy, security, and development.

Overall, the perspective of the course will be synthetic: it will seek to apply insights from research and scholarship to help advance practical understanding of what is happening, why, and how things might be done better.  The bridge between theory and practice will go both ways:  we will both use theoretical concepts to help understand specific issues, and use evidence from these issues to help criticize and refine theoretical claims.

Law 513 - Topics in California Environmental Law

This course will provide an intensive look at California’s approaches to several areas of environmental and natural resources law.   California’s environmental regulatory systems raise important legal and policy issues, including questions of federalism, effective governance, and management of resources under scarcity.  California’s approach to regulation differs from that of the federal government in important respects, but the state has also developed structures and substantive laws that overlap or complement federal laws.  Litigation by stakeholders plays a unique role in implementing and enforcing some of California’s environmental laws.  At the same time, many of our laws have served as models for federal law as well as that of other states.  This seminar will enable a small group of students to study California’s environmental laws in an in-depth way.  The course will focus on a subset of topics for more intensive study and reflection, rather than attempt to be comprehensive.  Topics may include, for example, the California Environmental Quality Act; Proposition 65; air quality, water quality, and greenhouse gas regulation; coastal management; water resources; and forest management. 

M514. Seminar: Cultural Property Law (1)

(Same as American Indian Studies M272.) Seminar, three hours. Exploration of identity, ownership, appropriation, and repatriation of both tangible and intangible cultural property -- those items that are of great significance to cultural heritage and cultural survival of people. Consideration of importance of preservation of cultural property as means of maintaining group identity, self-determination, and collective rights. Examination of both international and domestic law governing these issues, addressing such questions as How should cultural property be defined? Can cultural property by protected under existing intellectual property and cultural property regimes? How can we balance protection of cultural property against need or desire for its use in creative expression or scientific advancement? Examination of cultural property of groups in general, with emphasis on cultural property of indigenous peoples, including folklore, traditional knowledge, burial grounds, sacred sites, and ancient ceremonies and traditions. Letter grading.

Law M526 - Urban Housing and Community Development

This course will examine the past forty years of federal and state programs to stem urban decline and improve housing in the U.S. The course will compare and contrast a variety of legal and policy initiatives in the areas of public housing, housing segregation, mortgage subsidies, landlord-tenant law, urban renewal, and community organizing, seeking to develop an understanding of how and why programs succeed or fail. A paper will be required.

Law 556 - Animals in Agriculture

Animals in agriculture comprise over 98% of all animals raised and killed in the United States each year – over ten billion land animals alone. These animals also suffer some of the most prolonged and acute suffering of all animals, and are among the least legally protected. The vast majority of animal products are produced using industrial methods, confining large numbers of animals in small spaces for most or all of their lives, and routinely performing painful acts on these animals. Colloquially this has come to be known as “factory farming.” These practices not only impact the treatment of animals, but are also massive contributors to global climate change, pollution, resource consumption, world hunger, poor conditions for farm workers, and human health risks from infectious diseases. Eating animal products has also been strongly linked to some of the biggest killers of Americans, including heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers. The impact of industrial animal agriculture spans across social justice issues; developing a sophisticated understanding of this system is central to animal law as well as a variety of other social, political, and legal fields.

The farmed animal law field has grown rapidly and continues to evolve. A diverse set of legal tools has been used to accomplish tangible changes in farmed animal law and policy. These include criminal law, false advertising law, administrative law, unfair business practices, antitrust, corporate law, and constitutional law, among others. Significant changes have also been made at the legislative level, through the use of ballot initiatives and other tools. Students will be educated about animal law while touching on a variety of substantive areas of law, and taught to analyze them in the context of the dynamic and complex system of farmed animal law.

Law 591 - Climate and Energy Law and Policy

Global climate change is emerging as the most significant environmental, if not societal, issue of our era. Climate change will pose profound challenges for our regulatory institutions, for businesses, and for all of us in our daily lives. It will be crucial for governments and businesses to adopt legal and regulatory efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the impacts of a changing climate. This seminar will explore cutting-edge public policy, legal, and scientific challenges involved in assessing and addressing the causes and impacts of climate change on our society.  The class will place an emphasis on the interrelationship between climate change regulation and energy policy.

Law 611A/B - Climate Change and Energy Law

The course will enroll up to 16 students, from law and other graduate programs, who will each week read the work of a scholar who will present a paper on the topic of either climate change and/or energy law. Tentatively there will be 11-12 speakers. Each week one or two students will introduce the paper and provide commentary on it before opening up the session to questions from the audience. Speakers may cover issues relevant to: efforts to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by the international community; efforts to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions domestically; efforts to adapt to climate change; and energy law. Speakers will include legal scholars and professors from a variety of law schools.

Students will be expected to write reaction papers to each of the papers during the semester and their grades will be based on those papers. The reaction papers will be provided to the author as well as the student/s who will provide commentary on the paper as an introduction to the class discussion.

Law 621 - Market Mechanisms for Environmental Regulation

This seminar will examine market mechanisms to regulate pollution and conserve limited natural resources.  We will use case studies of various economic approaches, such as fishing quotas, nutrient trading, water trading, forest offsets, wetlands banking, and carbon cap-and-trade.  The first few weeks of the course will be devoted to a broad understanding of economic principles important to these types of economic-based regulatory approaches. 

The goal of this course is to develop a framework of analysis for understanding and critiquing a wide variety of market mechanisms in the environmental field.  Many of the specific mechanisms that we will study share structural commonalities and thus may have common benefits or flaws.  Given that this is a law school course, the legal underpinnings for these sample mechanisms will be at the forefront of our discussion.  Students will be responsible for occasional reading responses and a final paper.  Participation in the weekly class discussion is also expected.

Law 634 - Food Law and Policy

The rise of large urban centers and global food trade has generated a modern food system that is different than anything the world has ever experienced.  This modern food system - from the farm to the fork - has given rise to profound health, social, and cultural consequences that are being documented and debated in popular and scholarly publications, public policy forums, and the social media.  Bundling these consequences into a series of legal and policy issues, this course will facilitate discussion on a host of topics: obesity, nutrition, food deserts, food safety, labeling and marketing, trade, biotechnology, organic, sustainability, private standards, urban agriculture, hunger, right-to-food, animal welfare, local food programs, and farmers' markets.  Readings of cases, legislation, regulations, and provocative writings will both frame and stimulate these multi-doctrinal discussions.  This course will also review the development of food law - both historically from a diachronic and thematic perspective - and the role of the modern global governance of food in the legal system and in the kitchens of consumers. At the same time, individual papers and projects will permit in-depth exploration of a topic of interest.  Such papers and projects will contribute to the new and vibrant scholarship emerging on food governance at UCLA Law School.        

Law 719 - Environmental Law Clinic

The course is designed to train students in lawyering by exposing them to actual environmental law cases.  Under faculty supervision, students represent environmental and environmental justice organizations on a variety of matters, usually in collaboration with other experienced counsel.  The clinic typically works on matters involving environmental protection(including climate change), environmental justice, land use, and natural resources issues, and has worked on other issues as well (for example, defense of the first amendment rights of environmental activists).   In any given semester, clinic students will typically work on cases involving some, but not all, of these issues.  The course teaches transferable skills that will be applicable across a broad range of practice areas, including practice areas outside the subject matter of clinic cases.  While some clinic projects are litigation-oriented, many projects involve administrative law or policy advocacy. Through classroom study, students learn the substantive law and advocacy skills necessary to work effectively on the cases, and grapple as well with issues of judgment and ethics in the practice of law.

Depending upon the needs of the clinic’s cases, case work may include any of the following: preparation of memos analyzing law or facts, motion drafting, administrative comment drafting, oral argument, trial preparation, negotiations, client interviewing and counseling, working with experts, administrative representation and advocacy, fact investigation, discovery preparation, and preparation of policy-oriented papers. Class sessions will include training and exercises to improve practical lawyering skills.

Law 741 - Environmental Aspects of Business Transactions

The acquisition of a going concern raises a host of environmental issues to be resolved and integrated into the larger transaction. It also offers an excellent context in which students can learn some of the substantive knowledge and practical skills needed by lawyers practicing in the fields of business, real estate and environmental law. This course will use the simulated sale of an actual facility (including the real estate and business) to explore these areas.

The course will start with an introduction to basic principles relating to the larger business transaction. Subsequent course work will include legal analysis, drafting and simulated negotiation in a series of scenarios. The scenarios will likely include: (1) legal and factual analysis in performing due diligence (including analysis of potential regulatory violations and potential environmental liabilities from contamination on site), (2) drafting and negotiation of the environmental agreement (including cost-sharing provisions, indemnifications and issues related to permit transfers and the like), and (3) negotiation and drafting of consent order(s) with regulators regarding identified regulatory violations and on-site contamination.

The course will be self-contained. In other words, those aspects of substantive environmental, real estate and business law needed for the course will be taught as part of the course. While previous experience in courses such as Environmental Law and Real Estate Finance would be helpful, those courses are not prerequisites. The class will be a graded, four credit course, meeting twice a week for two hours each day.

MANAGEMENT

246A. Business and Environment (4)

Lecture, three hours. Overview of many ways in which environmental issues interact with main functional areas of business: finance, marketing, strategy, operations, accounting. Basic introduction to background of environmental issues, with focus primarily on business aspects. Specific topics vary from year to year, but course details what every manager should know about environmental issues in business. S/U or letter grading.

246C. Management in Public and Private Nonprofit Sectors (4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Examination of roles and management systems of the three sectors of U.S. society; unique aspects and managerial issues of public and private nonprofit organizations and of their political, social, and technical environments. Financial, marketing, and operational considerations and evaluation, control, and ethical issues of service delivery systems.

298D. Real Estate Social Entrepreneurship (4)

In-depth, hands-on introductory exploration of how to design, build, and scale mission-driven business. Through combination of case studies, guest speakers, and theoretical frameworks, students learn how to create high-impact ventures that drive financial return and social impact.

298D. Green Energy and Entrepreneurship (4)

Volatile commodity prices, geopolitical instability, and increased awareness of global warming have moved energy into mainstream of consumer consciousness. With roughly 85% of world energy consumption derived from fossil fuels, new wave of investment is underway to find alternative sources and technologies. Provides students with firm understanding of dynamics of global energy market. Equips students with tools necessary to build and/or manage successful green energy start-up. Gives insight into decisions made by cleantech-focused venture capitalists. Lectures, industry readings, guest speakers, and exercises help students understand dynamic between entrepreneurs, regulators, venture capitalists, strategic partners, and customers in energy world. Each module consists of strategy component focused on understanding traditional energy and cleantech markets, and entrepreneurship component to teach strategies for building successful company.

MOLECULAR, CELL, AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

C250. Plant Communication (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: Life Sciences 3, 4. Most people think of plants as static organisms, yet they live in world of symbiosis and community. Plants change atmosphere, enrich soil, and communicate with insects, bacteria, and each other -- Earth's ultimate symbiote. Just as science has revealed over time misconceptions about how things work at deeper level, scientists and economists now recognize that beyond obvious need to grow above-ground biomass for fuel production, we must better understand how to make that biomass in sustainable manner. Introductory course in chemical ecology and how natural compounds affect gene expression. Emphasis on role of natural compounds in plant/microbe, plant/plant, and plant/herbivore. Interactions; synopsis of principles of plant defense mechanisms and responses to microbial infections. Concurrently scheduled with course C150. S/U or letter grading.

PUBLIC POLICY

M222. Transportation Economics, Finance, and Policy (4)

(Same as Urban Planning M256.) Lecture, three hours. Overview of transportation finance and economics; concepts of efficiency and equity in transportation finance; historical evolution of highway and transit finance; current issues in highway finance; private participation in road finance, toll roads, road costs and cost allocation, truck charges, congestion pricing; current issues in transit finance; transit fare and subsidy policies, contracting and privatization of transit services. Letter grading.

M223. Transportation and Environmental Issues (4)

(Same as Urban Planning M258.) Lecture, three hours. Regulatory structure linking transportation, air quality, and energy issues, chemistry of air pollution, overview of transportation-related approaches to air quality enhancement; new car tailpipe standards; vehicle inspection and maintenance issues; transportation demand management and transportation control measures; alternative fuels and electric vehicles; corporate average fuel economy and global warming issues; growth of automobile worldwide fleet; automobile in sustainability debate. Letter grading.

CM250. Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (4)

(Same as Urban Planning M267.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 204 and 208, or Urban Planning 207 and 220B. Survey of ways economics is used to define, analyze, and resolve problems of environmental management. Overview of analytical questions addressed by environmental economists that bear on public policies. Concurrently scheduled with course C115. Letter grading.

M252. Introduction to Environmental Policy (4)

(Same as Urban Planning M263.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to basic concepts and methods of environmental analysis covering variety of topics with cross-disciplinary perspectives. Development of ability to analyze major environmental and resource issues as well as to read, discuss, and write critically about environmental policy. Letter grading. 

290. International Poverty and Economic Development (4)

Economic and empirical analysis of poverty and related topics such as health and education in international economic development. Emphasis on applying tools of microeconomics and empirical analysis for thinking critically about poverty and economic development. Aims to familiarize students with recent academic research on various topics. Sub-theme is to provide professional tools and experience in using data sets for analysis. Letter grading.

URBAN PLANNING

M202A. Land Use (1 to 8)

(Same as Law M286.) Lecture, three hours. Course M202A is enforced requisite to 202B. Exploration of 21st-century land-use public controls, private practice, and litigation in California from basic planning, zoning, subdivision controls, and official mapping to regional growth management, sustainability, and environmentally sensitive land protection. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 202B).

202B. Land Use (1 to 8)

Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M202A. Continuation of course M202A. Exploration of 21st-century land-use public controls, private practice, and litigation in California from basic planning, zoning, subdivision controls, and official mapping to regional growth management, sustainability, and environmentally sensitive land protection. S/U or letter grading.

M 232. Disaster Management and Response (4)

ecture, three hours. Through readings and presentations, examination of disaster management and response in both U.S. and developing countries. Exploration of how disaster impacts and risk reduction both relate to economic, vulnerability, and political factors, in addition to acts of nature. Structured to allow students to focus on distinct disaster contexts and themes as set out in reading and weekly sessions. Letter grading.

M234B. Ecological Issues in Planning (4)

(Formerly numbered 234B.) (Same as Geography M229B.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: course M265. Science and politics of modern environmentalism and planning in light of transformations inherent in global change, including how to address these questions in ways that go beyond green consumerism and bifurcation of wild, ecological, and human environments. American environmentalism has become dominant model for many conservation practices. Informed by Muirist model of idea of untrammeled nature with people-less set-asides for spiritual and scientific contemplation of nature; this approach used in environmental policy and as key idea in conservation and fragment biology. At opposite end is environmental planning devoted to infrastructure in hyper-human habitats (cities). Exploration of these competing models and many reasons to be skeptical of both in 21st century. Letter grading.

M234C. Resource-Based Development (4)

(Same as Geography M229C.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: course M234A. Some major issues associated with development of specific natural resources. Topics include nature of particular resource (or region associated with it), its previous management, involvement of state, corporations, and local groups, and environmental and social impact of its development. Letter grading.

UP 235 A  Urbanization in Developing World (4)

Lecture 3 hours.  Course 235A is not requisite to 235B.  Questions of urbanization and planning in low-and middle-income countries.  Case studies from Latin America, Africa, and Asia.  Lectures, student presentations, and policy debates.
Letter grading.

M258. Transportation and Environmental Issues (4)

(Same as Public Policy M223.) Lecture, three hours. Regulatory structure linking transportation, air quality, and energy issues, chemistry of air pollution, overview of transportation-related approaches to air quality enhancement; new car tailpipe standards; vehicle inspection and maintenance issues; transportation demand management and transportation control measures; alternative fuels and electric vehicles; corporate average fuel economy and global warming issues; growth of automobile worldwide fleet; automobile in sustainability debate. Letter grading.

M 254. Transportation, Land Use, and Urban Form (4)

Lecture, three hours. Historical evolution of urban form and transportation systems, intrametropolitan location theory, recent trends in urban form, spatial mismatch hypothesis, jobs/housing balance, transportation in strong central city and polycentric city, neotraditional town planning debate, rail transit and urban form. Letter grading.

260. Environmental Politics and Governance (4)

(Formerly numbered C260.) Lecture, three hours. Environmental planning is more than simply finding problems and fixing them. Each policy must be negotiated and implemented within multiple, complex systems of governance. Institutions and politics matter deeply. Overview of how environmental governance works in practice and how it might be improved. Letter grading.

262. Urban Environmental Problems: Water Resources (4)

Lecture, three hours. Water is life and wealth in California, which has world's most extensive long-distance, interbasin water transfer system. To date, water resources planning has been devoted almost exclusively to adding facilities for water delivery. But conflicts over additional developments have basically precluded further extension of this system, despite growing pressures to increase supplies. Examination of environmental impacts, geography, use of water, and consideration of resource planning. S/U or letter grading.

M263. Introduction to Environmental Policy (4)

(Formerly numbered 263.) (Same as Public Policy M252.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to basic concepts and methods of environmental analysis covering variety of topics with cross-disciplinary perspectives. Development of ability to analyze major environmental and resource issues as well as to read, discuss, and write critically about environmental policy. Letter grading.

M264A. Environmental Law (1 to 8)

(Formerly numbered M264.) (Same as Law M290.) Lecture, three hours. Course M264A is enforced requisite to 264B. Examination of field of environmental law through analysis of various legal issues and public policy: legal consequences of public decision-making strategies and allocation of primary responsibility for various environmental decisions. Focus on air pollution and Clean Air Act as means of illustrating policy issues underlying field. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 264B).

264B. Environmental Law (1 to 8)

Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M264A. Continuation of course M264A. Examination of field of environmental law through analysis of various legal issues and public policy: legal consequences of public decision-making strategies and allocation of primary responsibility for various environmental decisions. Focus on air pollution and Clean Air Act as means of illustrating policy issues underlying field. S/U or letter grading.

M265. Environmentalisms (4)

(Formerly numbered 265.) (Same as Geography M265.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Review of environmental theories and their practices in dynamic U.S. and international contexts. Issues of climate change, scenario planning, and matrix ecology and its implications in both urban and rural settings. Exploration of problematics of increasing internationalization (or international implications) of environmental practices as part of both green and black economies. What does integrated environmental planning look like in this century? Letter grading.

C266. Global Environment and Development: Problems and Issues (4)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Questions of population, resource use, Third World poverty, and environment. Analysis of global economic restructuring and its connections to changing organization of production and resulting environmental impacts. Case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and U.S. Concurrently scheduled with course CM166. S/U or letter grading.

M267. Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy (4)

(Same as Public Policy CM250.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 207 and 220B, or Public Policy 204 and 208. Survey of ways economics is used to define, analyze, and resolve problems of environmental management. Overview of analytical questions addressed by environmental economists that bear on public policies. Letter grading.

M268. Policy Analysis of Emerging Environmental Technologies (4)

(Same as Public Policy M286.) Lecture, three hours. Acquisition and utilization of economic, finance, planning, and policy analytic tools needed to evaluate factors that drive market adoption from early to middle market phases. Rooftop solar, electric vehicle, and energy efficiency as focal examples, with emphasis on role of policy and planning incentives intended to spur adoption. Letter grading.

M291. Introduction to Sustainable Architecture and Community Planning (4)

(Same as Architecture and Urban Design CM247A.) Lecture, three hours. Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land. Letter grading.

M 269. Green Urban Studio (“Special Topics in Environmental Analysis and Policy”) (4)

Today's urban sustainability dialog focuses on neighborhood as the preferred place of engagement for developing and implementing proposals to retrofit and revitalize existing urban areas. In this view, neighborhoods are a spatial and social unit where infrastructure efficiencies can be shared, economies can be localized, and sustainable behavior can be embedded into social norms. Students gain detailed knowledge of innovative methods to address issues of energy, water, waste, food, transportation, habitat, biomimicry, social engagement, and local economies through hands-on application of the Living Building Challenge to a Los Angeles neighborhood. Students produce an illustrated document detailing a plan for transforming the neighborhood and a presentation summarizing components of the plan. Skills in quantitative analysis and graphic representation are emphasized. Studio format. Letter grading

M 269. Climate Change and Health (“Special Topics in Environmental Analysis and Policy”) (4)

Identification of many of the threats associated with climate change, to look at various regions and their specific threats and solutions, and to examine case studies at a regional level and see what can be learned from existing efforts. Requires discussion and exploration of 21st-century solutions. Students think about specific issues around health, the health care system and its response to climate threats, and approaches to adaptation, mitigation, and disaster response and relief. Discussion of global responses including major global threats, policy and planning solutions, and health impacts. Addresses key themes that relate to human health, including urban health and nutrition impacts of climate change, population movement and migration, and impacts of food systems and water. Provides global and regional overviews of current research and policy making, as well as specific regional and country focus.

M 269. Environmental Justice (“Special Topics in Environmental Analysis and Policy”) (4)

Review of main analytic frameworks for understanding environmental justice: externalities, new institutional, and political ecology as well as some emerging frameworks that might be called foucauldian that pertain to governmentality. Through analysis of nature of current environmental problems, theories used to explain them, and how different approaches address them in policy and practice, understanding of environmental justice moves well beyond frameworks of externalities that have dominated planning profession and in many ways made it irrelevant to current controversies. Intensive reading. Students required to present case-study materials.

M 239. Sustainable Cities in the Developing World (“Special Topics in Regional and International Development”) (4)

Review of contexts, issues, policies, and practices related to sustainable development of cities in China and India, especially during their recent decades of rapid urbanization. Students are expected to gain a comprehensive understanding of the process and characteristics of the two largest developing countries' ongoing urbanization and its environmental consequences, broader impacts to nation and world, role of institutions and policies, and how urban planning and policy could make cities more environmentally sustainable.

Dates to Remember

LiS Annual Kick-off Event
Thursday, October 23, 4-6pm
IoES 300 La Kretz Hall, Large Conference Room

LiS Application deadline
Applications for new students to join the program are due November 17, 2014.

Click here to apply

Petition to Graduate Deadline
November 14, 2014
Click here to access the petition

Student Coordinators

Elizabeth McElroy
Elizabeth McElroy

Student Coordinator, LiS Program

Ariana Vito
Ariana Vito

Student Coordinator, LiS Program

To contact us please send email to: UCLALeadersInSustainability@gmail.com

For more information please contact

Myrna Gordon
ESE/LiS Program Administrator
mgordon@ioes.ucla.edu.